Digital Visual Culture (Book)

Theory and Practice

Digital Visual Culture presents the latest research into the relationship between theory and practice across digital media and technology in the visual arts and investigates the challenges of contemporary research and art curation, particularly in regard to new media artworks. The contributors to this volume discuss the impact of technological advances on visual art and the new art practices that are developing as a result. Many aspects of new interdisciplinary and collaborative practices are considered, such as net art and global locative environments, , and installations that are themselves performance, or games that often take place simultaneously online and in reality. Digital Visual Culture is an important addition to the ongoing discussion surrounding postmodern art practice in art and digital media.

Category: Visual Arts

Edition

Digital creativity is boundless. Art practitioners and scholars continue to explore what technology has to offer and practice-based research is redefining their disciplines. What happens when an artist experiments with bio-scientific data and discovers something the scientists failed to notice? How do virtual telematic environments affect our relationship with the object and our understanding of identity and presence? Interactive engagement with the creative process takes precedence over the finite piece thus affecting the roles of the artist and the viewer.The experience of arts computing in the last decades provides a sound basis for theorising this practice. Since its inception in 1985, CHArt – Computers and the History of Art – has been at the forefront of international debate on digital art practice, curation and scholarship. The ten papers included in this volume, the third CHArt Yearbook published by Intellect, are drawn from recent CHArt conferences. The authors seek to articulate methodological and theoretical perspectives on digital media, including communication and preservation of digital artworks. These issues are pertinent to contemporary visual culture and may help deepen its understanding.

Anna Bentkowska-Kafel is a research fellow for the 3D Visualisation in the Arts Network at King’s College London. Trish Cashen teaches at the Open University. Hazel Gardiner is editor for the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland.

Related Titles