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Global Health Humanities series

Series Editors

Susan Hogan & Anna Greenwood 

 

Global Health Humanities is a new book series from Intellect that will look at the global health humanities from a number of perspectives, incorporating: 

  • medical humanities 
  • health humanities (broadly defined) 
  • history of medicine 
  • arts and health 

Contributions to the series will focus on a wide range of subjects and will utilise numerous methodologies and perspectives. 

A wide range of critical studies interrogating the epistemology of knowledge production will be considered. Forms of health knowledge production will be questioned. This is a series that will be attentive to the mutually constitutive nature of gender, sexual identity, cultural identity, disability, age and other categories of difference that shape social practices and individual lives. This sensitivity to cultural perspectives will form a critical, and distinctive, lens for the series. Topics of interest will include, but not be restricted to, global health inequalities and the health humanities; critical reflections on global health humanities; conceptualisations of health; global health in health humanities scholarship; global maternal health; critical analysis of representations of health and illness across cultures; gender inequality; gender issues in the arts and health. 

The series will have multiple formats: traditional scholarly monographs, edited collections and shorter format volumes. It is anticipated that the shorter format will provide an easily accessible medium as a ‘way in’ for readers to learn about new aspects of health humanities. The shorter format books will comprise accessibly written, but still scholarly and referenced, introductions or case studies. Authors will include established scholars in the field, emerging early-career scholars, and practitioners. 

Whilst health is a universal issue, it is experienced differently by those with different genders and sexual orientations. The way women, men, intersex, non-binary, and transgender people relate via the arts and humanities to their health remains under-researched. This is a striking omission in today’s world increasingly attuned to multiple modes of gender identification, as well as the ever-changing roles of women and men. 

The series is targeted to appeal to health humanities scholars, clinicians and carers, and arts and humanities practitioners, as well as the learned general public. 

Brief expressions of interest can be sent to s.hogan@derby.ac.uk or anna.greenwood@nottingham.ac.uk

Download CFP

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