Selling War (Book)

The Role of the Mass Media in Hostile Conflicts from World War I to the "War on Terror"

Edited by Josef Seethaler

This book is the first collection of essays to explore the changing relationships between war, media, and the public from a multidisciplinary perspective and over an extended historical period. It is also the first textbook for students in this field, discussing a wide range of theoretical concepts and methodological tools for analyzing the nature of these relationships. Shedding new light on conflicts spanning from World War I through the so-called War on Terror, the contributors explore the roles of traditional media, war blogs, and eyewitness reporting; of war correspondents and embedded journalism; and of propaganda, wartime public relations, and information warfare.

Edition

This book is the first collection of essays to explore the changing relationships between war, media, and the public from a multidisciplinary perspective and over an extended historical period. It is also the first textbook for students in this field, discussing a wide range of theoretical concepts and methodological tools for analyzing the nature of these relationships. The book starts with a thorough overview by Philip Seib of war, the media and the public sphere. His chapter explores how the perception of war in the public sphere is influenced by the media and, more precisely, how the news media define and perform their social function in relation to war. It points to the fact that it is not only the way in which journalists deliver news about war to the public that affects how people think about war. Information and its impact on the public are also influenced, to a varying extent, by the medium that conveys the message. The impact of newspaper articles differs from that of a live television report from the battlefield, which in turn differs from an amateur’s YouTube video, not just in terms of production but also in terms of access and consumption. Obviously, changes in the media environment and its technologies affect the nature of news journalism, the role of professional communication and the way media messages are perceived by the public

Josef Seethaler is a senior scientist at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna. Matthias Karmasin is chair of media and communication sciences at the University of Klagenfurt. Gabriele Melischek is a consultant to the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, where Romy Wöhlert is a researcher.

'Clear and logical' 

International Journal of Communication, Congying Chen

'This book will be of particular relevance to researchers of European media, as well as being more than useful for anyone at postgraduate level or above interested in audience and reception studies in contemporary media environments.' 

Media International Australia, Damien Spry
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