Journal of Scandinavian Cinema (Journal)

ISSN 20427891 , ONLINE ISSN 20427905

Journal of Scandinavian Cinema is a double-blind peer-reviewed scholarly journal devoted to excellent research and stimulating discussion focusing on the cinemas of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, both within their national and Nordic contexts, and as transnational cinemas in a globalized world.

Category: Film Studies


Editors

Anders Marklund
Lund University

Mette Hjort
Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Pietari Kääpä
University of Warwick

Gunnar Iversen
Carleton University

Managing Editor

Rochelle Wright
University of Illinois
wrightr@illinois.edu

Journal of Scandinavian Cinema is a scholarly journal devoted to excellent research and stimulating discussion focusing on the cinemas of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, both within their national and Nordic contexts, and as transnational cinemas in a globalized world.

The Nordic countries have a rich history of fiction and non-fiction filmmaking as well as lively contemporary screen cultures. Journal of Scandinavian Cinema places no restrictions on time period or genre, but particularly encourages the examination of previously uncharted subject matter and the use of new approaches. In that regard, we anticipate that research on Scandinavian cinema will be broadened through the application of ideas, concepts and research traditions from related disciplines. The journal also seeks to highlight the relevance of other audio-visual media and screen cultures, both those that have coexisted with film for some time (such as television) and those that are still gaining importance (such as online video).

Scholars from film studies, Scandinavian studies and any related field are invited to explore Journal of Scandinavian Cinema and to contribute articles that inspire a deeper understanding and an ongoing exchange of ideas across national and disciplinary boundaries.


Editors

Anders Marklund
Lund University

Mette Hjort
Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Pietari Kääpä
University of Warwick

Gunnar Iversen
Carleton University

Managing Editor

Rochelle Wright
University of Illinois
wrightr@illinois.edu

Editors

Anders Marklund
Lund University

Mette Hjort
Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Pietari Kääpä
University of Warwick

Gunnar Iversen
Carleton University

Managing Editor

Rochelle Wright
University of Illinois
wrightr@illinois.edu

Editors

Anders Marklund
Lund University

Mette Hjort
Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Pietari Kääpä
University of Warwick

Gunnar Iversen
Carleton University

Managing Editor

Rochelle Wright
University of Illinois
wrightr@illinois.edu

Notes for Contributors Download

Nordic Film Music and Sound Download


‘Nordic Film Music and Sound’

A special issue of Journal of Scandinavian Cinema

Guest editors: Gunnar Iversen (Carleton University), Pietari Kaapa (University of Warwick), Kate Moffat (University of Stirling)

‘Working from a multifaceted musical palette with a vast variety of experiences to draw from, the Nordic film and media composers are known for their ability to do whatever it takes to tell the story; whatever it takes to serve the film. You can say that Nordic composers make their movies and directors win prizes’ (Nordic Film Music Days).

Nordic cinema has consistently enjoyed a curious relationship with popular culture. As part of small nation cinemas, audience sizes are restricted, requiring institutional support to sustain a healthy film industry. Thus, Nordic cinemas have tended to prioritize artistic or experimental filmmaking, resulting in respected international auteurs like Ingmar Bergman, Lars von Trier, Roy Andersson and Pirjo Honkasalo.

While these filmmakers have been explored endlessly in international scholarship, film music and sound remains a frequently ignored aspect of their work. Beyond the Nordic region, and specifically in relation to Hollywood cinema, there is an emerging body of research focusing on the role and relevance of the film score as a key signifier of narrative meaning (such as Murphy’s harmonic taxonomy [2006, 2014], which explores the reciprocal relationship between text and orchestration). The work of both domestic and internationally recognizable composers from the Nordic countries remains largely unexplored in the context of these theoretical interventions, a problematic oversight due to the complex histories of musical innovation from these countries. Similarly, the role of sound as well as voice (dialect, sociolect, gender) remains a field that has been neglected in film studies in general but has been important in Nordic film production.

These concerns have become even more urgent with distinct transformations in Nordic film production, which has seen increased investment in popular and especially genre cinema since the 1990s. Subsequently, Nordic film scores have moved from experimental soundscapes to emulating international trends and standards, both in use of melodic content and in the incorporation of large orchestras and advanced synth soundscapes. Film composers like Tuomas Kantelinen and Søren Hyldgaard have consolidated professional careers as industry specialists and often broken out into global film culture. We can also consider the increasingly transnational presence of Nordic composers and multi-instrumentalists like Ólafur Arnalds (whose portfolio includes the BAFTA award-winning score for British noir series Broadchurch [2013-15]) and Jóhann Jóhannsson’s Academy Award nominations for Best Original Score in The Theory of Everything (Marsh, 2014) and Sicario (Villeneuve, 2016). Equally, discussion of scores by the likes of Henrik Skram, Trond Bjerknes, Panu Aaltio and Johan Söderqvist, whose work reaches across a broad range of visual media and genres, remains significantly underdeveloped in both domestic and international contexts.

Journal of Scandinavian Cinema has prioritized this emerging field for an upcoming special issue, triggered by a rising interest in this area, especially following composer Ludwig Göransson’s recent Best Score Oscar for Black Panther (Coogler, 2018) (as well as several Grammies for his producing work for Childish Gambino) and the continued success of Nordic Film Music Days.

The influence of European composers, Hollywood and other global trends on Nordic soundscapes, as well as of Nordic composers on global standards, opens a discussion on the crisscrossing of sonic identities, ideas and methods. Also key here is the role Nordic identity plays in building aesthetic relationships between music and narrative, especially in relation to the region’s distinct musical histories. Consequently, film music represents a critical site of investigation, particularly in the context of the increasingly globalizing film and media cultures of the Nordic countries. By studying these recent developments, we can also use the innovation and diversity reflected in Nordic soundscapes to further strengthen the case for supporting and promoting the artistic merit of film composition and sound design more generally.

At stake here are areas of considerable relevance for Journal of Scandinavian Cinema. This includes an increased investment in exploring Nordic success stories in international markets, but also significant innovation in domestic production.

The issue encourages submissions on the following themes and also welcomes work outside/combining these areas:

  • The role of the professional film composer
  • The Nordic soundtrack community (fans and communal events such as Nordic Film Music Days)
  • Transnational soundscapes
  • Moviescore Media (Nordic soundtrack label specializing in international film scores)
  • The history of Nordic film music (especially the respective Studio Eras)
  • Classical cross-overs (Einar Englund, Jukka Linkola etc.)
  • Sound and genre
  • Indigenous soundscapes (e.g. minority cultures and music/sound)
  • The role of voices, dialects and sociolects in Nordic film culture
  • Technology, industry, practice and education
  • The broader role of music cultures
  • Synergy and the creation of soundscapes – for instance examining the relationships and thematic interplay between landscape and sound in Nordic film culture
  • The relationship between sound and themes of duality, opposition, temporality and authenticity
  • The role of technology in the shaping or re-shaping of musical conventions, including the channels of production, distribution and collaboration
  • The diversity of musical training and backgrounds
  • Influence of other genres considered indigenous (metal; Tuomas Holopainen and Nightwish)

Projected timeline for contributions:

Proposals of 500 words maximum – 1 August 2019

Full article submission (8000 words maximum) – February 2020

All contributions will undergo double-blind peer review. Publication is slated for December 2020.

Please email the guest editors (GunnarIversen@cunet.carleton.ca; Pietari.Kaapa@warwick.ac.uk; k.l.moffat@stir.ac.uk) to discuss potential contributions.

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General Call for Papers

All articles submitted should be original work and must not be under consideration by other publications.

Download the Journal of Scandinavian Cinema (JSCA) Notes for Contributors.

JSCA is a peer-refereed scholarly journal devoted to all aspects of film culture in Scandinavia (including Finland and Iceland). The journal aims to be an indispensable contributor to the growth of knowledge about Scandinavian filmmaking and to provide a stimulating platform for discussions on Scandinavian cinema and its social and cultural background. The editors welcome full-length articles (4000-8000 words) as well as shorter items such as interviews, conference reports and commented archival documents. Scholars in film studies, Scandinavian studies and related areas are invited to contribute articles that reflect their research and teaching interests and will inspire the exchange of ideas and expertise across nations and disciplines.

Possible research topics include:

  • Under-researched historical periods and topics or new approaches to established research areas
  • Scandinavian cinema in a global context: the international distribution and reception of Scandinavian films, the work of Scandinavian directors and actors in other countries and representations of the region and its people in international films
  • Film industry developments: funding, censorship and technological developments as well as the significance of new, digital forms of distribution and exhibition
  • Studies on genre, representation, national cinema and other theoretical concepts
  • Scandinavian directors, writers, producers and actors working in film and television, both within the region and internationally
  • Inter-art and inter-media discussions - for example, adaptations of literary works and film-television co-productions
  • Cinema’s role in the teaching and understanding of Scandinavian culture
  • Reports on new research projects and festivals as well as interviews with filmmakers and key persons within Scandinavian film culture

Although JSCA covers all historical periods, a major goal is to keep readers informed about what is going on today. Articles on recent trends, major film releases, ongoing film debates and other aspects of contemporary cinematic culture are particularly welcome.

Journal contributors will receive a free PDF copy of their final work upon publication. Print copies of the journal may also be purchased by contributors at half price. 

Editors

Anders Marklund
Lund University

Mette Hjort
Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Pietari Kääpä
University of Warwick

Gunnar Iversen
Carleton University

Managing Editor

Rochelle Wright
University of Illinois
wrightr@illinois.edu

 
Emerging Sources Citation Index
 
ERIH
 
Film and Television Literature Index
 
Film and Television Literature Index (with FT)
 
International Index to Film Periodicals
 
MLA
 
Scopus
 
Ulrich’s

Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2013


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2013


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2013


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2010


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2010


Editors

Anders Marklund
Lund University

Mette Hjort
Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Pietari Kääpä
University of Warwick

Gunnar Iversen
Carleton University

Managing Editor

Rochelle Wright
University of Illinois
wrightr@illinois.edu

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