The Cultural Practice of Immigrant Filmmaking (Book)

Minor Immigrant Cinemas in Sweden 1950–1990

The e-book of this work is licensed under the CC BY-NC-ND Licence. To view a copy of the licence, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Based on a research project funded by the Swedish Research Council, this book analyses 40 years of post-war independent immigrant filmmaking in Sweden. John Sundholm and Lars Gustaf Andersson consider the creativity that lies in the state of exile, offering analyses of over 50 rarely seen immigrant films that would otherwise remain invisible and unarchived. 

Edition

Based on a research project funded by the Swedish Research Council, this book analyses 40 years of post-war independent immigrant filmmaking in Sweden. John Sundholm and Lars Gustaf Andersson consider the creativity that lies in the state of exile, offering analyses of over 50 rarely seen immigrant films that would otherwise remain invisible and unarchived. They shed light on the complex web of personal, economic and cultural circumstances around migrant filmmaking, and discuss associations that became important sites of self-organization for exiled filmmakers: The Independent Film Group, The Stockholm Film Workshop, Cineco, Kaleidoscope and Tensta Film Association.

Using an innovative combination of key film theory, The Cultural Practice of Immigrant Filmmaking studies immigrant filmmaking in a transnational context, exploring how immigrant filmmakers use film to find a place in a new cultural situation.

The e-book of this work is licensed under the CC BY-NC-ND Licence. To view a copy of the licence, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Lars Gustaf Andersson is professor of film studies at Lund University.

John Sundholm is chair of the Department of Media Studies and professor of cinema studies at Stockholm University.  

Introduction

The Cultural Practice of Immigrant Filmmaking                                           

Migrants’ Minor Cinemas: Beyond Accented and Exilic Cinema                   

Conditions of Production: Immigrant’s Associations and Workshops in Sweden       

From Avant-garde to Communion: Ten Films by Immigrant Filmmakers in Sweden              

Fabulations in the minor key                                           

Study 1(Awakening) by Peter Weiss (1952)                                  

Alone by the Tensta Film Association (1974)                               

Do You Want to Join Me, Martha? by the Tensta Film Association (1980)

Interference by Maureen Paley (1977)                                         

The Earthman by Muammer Özer (1980)                         

The Mirage by Guillermo Álvarez/Cineco (1981)                         

The Sea is Far Away by Reza Bagher (1983)                                

The Promise by Menelaos Carayannis (1984)                               

The Waiting by Myriam Braniff (1989)                                        

Five Minutes for the Souls of America by César Galindo (1992)                

Projecting a public, creating a context                                          

The Cultural Practice of Minor Immigrant Cinema Archiving                                  

Conclusion: Immigrant Filmmaking as Minor Cinema Practice                               

 

‘This fascinating and painstakingly researched book unearths the rich history of immigrant filmmaking and film workshops in Sweden, interrogating the concept of minor cinema and the tenets of film historiography. Offering ten case studies, Andersson and Sundholm examine the films as one element in a complex process and practice encompassing filmmaker associations, film policy, audiences and archives.’

C. Claire Thomson, Associate Professor of Scandinavian Film, UCL

‘The theoretical and methodological discussion adds considerably to the existing body of research on immigrant cinemas’

‘The most original feature of this is the expansion of the usual scope – production/text/reception – to cover the archival fate of the films: not being properly recognized by the archival community, many of the minor cinema films will be liable to end up in oblivion. This study fulfils the important task of (re)gaining life to a valuable tradition of minor cinema.’

Kimmo Laine, Senior Lecturer at University of Oulu
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