Performing Arts in Prison (Book)

Creative Perspectives

Across the world, performing arts programs are increasing in number, scope and professionalism. They attract increasing academic and media attention. Theoretical and applied research, organisational evaluation reports, documentary films and journalism are detailing prison arts and create recognition that this body of work is becoming a valued part of the correctional enterprise. There is a growing body of evidence that suggests music, theatre, poetry and dance can contribute to prisoner wellbeing, management, rehabilitation and reintegration. Performing Arts in Prisons: Creative Perspectives explores prison arts in Australia, USA, UK and Chile, and creates a new framework for understanding its practices.

Category: Performing Arts

Edition

Across the world, performing arts programs are increasing in number, scope and professionalism. They attract increasing academic and media attention. Theoretical and applied research, organisational evaluation reports, documentary films and journalism are detailing prison arts and create recognition that this body of work is becoming a valued part of the correctional enterprise. There is a growing body of evidence that suggests music, theatre, poetry and dance can contribute to prisoner wellbeing, management, rehabilitation and reintegration. Performing Arts in Prisons: Creative Perspectives explores prison arts in Australia, USA, UK and Chile, and creates a new framework for understanding its practices.

Professor Michael Balfour is Chair in Applied Theatre in School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences at Griffith University. He is a theatre researcher and practitioner interested in the social and creative applications of the arts in a range of contexts. He has written widely on applied theatre, with a particular interest in theatre in conflict and peacebuilding, prison theatre, theatre and migration, theatre, mental health and returning military personnel and, most recently, creative ageing and dementia.

Associate Professor Brydie-Leigh Bartleet is Director of the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University, Australia. She is known worldwide for her research in community music and community engagement, and has worked on a range of national and international projects in community music, arts-based service learning with Australian First Peoples, arts programs in prisons and global mobility.

Linda Davey is a psychologist, theatre maker, arts educator, and academic. She was Research Fellow with the Captive Audiences project, based at Griffith University. Linda has worked as a senior psychologist in prisons and as a researcher with numerous publications in the area of offender rehabilitation.

Associate Professor John Rynne has extensive theoretical and applied knowledge of Australian and international criminal justice systems.  His academic qualifications are in psychology and prison reform.  From 1998 to 2002, as a Research Fellow at the Crime Research Centre of the University of Western Australia, he studied the impact of private prisons on the Australian custodial system with particular reference to Queensland.

Huib Schippers has a long and diverse history of research into music education, community music, artistic practice, arts policy, and the music industry. After establishing the World Music and Dance Centre in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, he was the Founding Director of the innovative Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia (2003-2015).

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