Journal of Visual Political Communication (Journal)

ISSN 26333732 , ONLINE ISSN 26333740

Journal of Visual Political Communication (formerly known as The Poster) is a forum for debate about the ways in which visual devices are used to form opinion, sway, persuade, provoke, unite and divide us. This peer-reviewed journal invites all scholars and practitioners of visual culture – its social operation, anthropology, philosophy, history, politics and creation – to join with us in an open debate about the ethics, aesthetics, effect and operation of visual rhetoric in the public sphere. A fully refereed and peer-reviewed through a rigorous process conducted by our international Editorial Board and team of Associate Editors, all selected for their ability to bring a unique insight into the applications of visual rhetoric in the public sphere and for their academic strength as researchers.

Formerly published as The Poster (ISSN 20403704, Online ISSN 20403712)

Category: Visual Arts


Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

The powerful have always used the creative industries to frame the world in ways that suit their aims: political communication is aimed at influencing the way we think about and act in relation to questions regarding society. It can address our appreciation of the past, our assessment of the present, or how we ought to change the future, and it is done by all kinds of actors, from individual citizens to organizations and governments. But no matter who does it and what its goal is, a main component is the visual. From sculptures and paintings, murals and posters, via film and television to today's plethora of digital images, moving as well as still, visual means are central to most forms of persuasion. 

Journal of Visual Political Communication (formerly known as The Poster) is devoted to the exploration of these forms of persuasive visual communication. How can we understand the use of images in today's political communication, and in particular the changes that have been taking place with the rapid growth of channels of distribution? In order to fully grasp the significance of imagery in political communication, we believe that it is imperative to maintain a historical and cultural perspective, and to combine a variety of methodologies. We encourage interdisciplinary approaches to visual political communication, including qualitative, quantitative, and experimental studies, exploring both the aesthetic expressions, the political content, and the intended and empirical effect on the public. We are looking for research contributions of a theoretical nature, from a practice-based perspective and from novel combinations of the two. We are also looking for visual contributions whose primary function is not research, but which illuminate the operation of the political communication in the world.

Join us.


Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

Notes for Contributors Download


All articles submitted should be original work and must not be under consideration by other publications.

Journal of Visual Political Communication (formerly known as The Poster) is a forum for the study of visual rhetoric in the public sphere; a place to discuss why and how visual messages are thrust into the world and the media forms used to do so. The journal stands as a vehicle for the ideas of media theorists; for scholars of cultural studies and cultural materialism; for social psychologists of visual communication; for architects and designers of way-finding schemes; for philosophers of aesthetics and politics, society and linguistics; for social scientists, anthropologists and ethnographers; for political campaigners and artist activists; for communications researchers and visual communications practitioners.

We are looking for research contributions of a theoretical nature, from a practice-based perspective and from novel combinations of the two. We are also looking for visual contributions whose primary function is not research, but which illuminate the operation of the poster in the world.


Areas of interest for studies of visual-political communication include (but are not limited to):

  • Is there a social disconnect with the normative narratives that mass communication depends on, rendering propaganda speechless?
  • Is the rise of the Digital Public Sphere killing consensus politics, or saving us from a weight of overbearing myth?
  • Does the disruption of large-scale monocultures by online communities mark an end for 20th century models of mass propaganda?
  • Are the subalterns taking control?
  • What happens to informed democratic systems when the rulers and the ruled fundamentally inhabit different worlds, shaped by different ideas?
  • Universal translators: Are there communication methods that can speak across the divides?
  • Can we ‘mass customize' political communication to speak the same truth, in different tongues, to all audiences at once?


The relationship between culture and technology has shaped political communication since the time of the Sacra Congregatio de Propaganda Fide, and now emergent communications tools have widened the grasp and increased the reach of a political message. The rise of the Net has given individuals and small groups the same grasp and reach as the largest power-block, and the possibilities for technically mediated political communication keep expanding.More than timely, it has become imperative for researchers to examine the complex interplay between the means and methods of political communication and the possibility of a normative consensus in the political world.

Multimodality is a key element to understanding the use of images in combination with other forms of mediated communication. We therefore encourage scholars from both social and political science, as well as cultural studies, arts, and communication studies, to submit proposals for work for publication. The journal is looking for:

  • Full papers of 7,000-9,000 words, plus illustrations on the issue's theme (for double blind peer review). Rich illustration of the text is welcomed. Theoretical papers as well as methodological discussion are welcomed, but preferably in combination with empirical analysis of imagery. Case studies, comparisons across culture, or historical studies are invited.
  • Artist/designer monographs: Extended scholarly pieces addressing the issue's theme (for double blind peer review). 10,000 – 25,000 words, plus extensive illustrations.
  • Image and photo essays composed of illustrations, photographs, diagrams or schematics that use visual languages to communicate their stance on this edition's themes. Textual support may be added, if necessary.
  • Reviews of relevant books, exhibitions and political gatherings (the editors would be more than happy to publish a good review of the US Republican or Democratic party conferences, a Congressional investigation or a demonstration).

Journal contributors will receive a free PDF copy of their final work upon publication. Print copies of the journal may also be purchased by contributors at half price.

Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

Editorial & Advisory Board

Jonathan Baldwin
University of South Wales

Paul Bowman
Cardiff University, UK

Hector Flores
Universidad de Guadalajara

Gerard Goggin
University of New South Wales

Steven Heller
School of Visual Arts, USA

Zeina Maasri
University of Brighton

Grace Lees-Maffei
University of Hertfordshire

Victor Margolin
University of Illinois, USA

Vincent Mosco
Queen's University, Northern Ireland, UK

Sarah Pink
Monash University

Janet Staiger
University of Texas

Graham Twemlow
University of Gloucestershire

Karel van der Waarde
Swinburne University of Technology

Jonathan Vickery
University of Warwick

Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

 
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Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (1&2)
  • Cover date:


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2011


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2011


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2010


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2010


Co-Editors

Orla Vigsø
Gothenburg University

Bengt Johansson
University of Gothenburg

Simon Downs
Loughborough University

Associate Editor

Helena Barbosa
Department of Communication and Art at the University of Aveiro, Portugal.

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