Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (Journal)

ISSN 20477368 , ONLINE ISSN 20477376

Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies is a fully peer-reviewed, English-language journal, which explores Italian cinema and media as sites of crossing, allowing critical discussion of the work of filmmakers, artists in the film industry and media professionals. The journal intends to revive a critical discussion on the auteurs, celebrate new directors and accented cinema and examine Italy as a geo-cultural locus for contemporary debate on translocal cinema.

NEW SECTION ANNOUNCEMENT: Translations & Archival Notes



Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies is an English-language forum for theoretical, methodological and critical debate on Italian film and media production, reception and consumption. It provides a platform for dialogue between academics, filmmakers, cinema and media professionals. This peer-reviewed journal invites submissions of scholarly articles relating to the artistic features, cultural themes, international influence and history of Italian film and media. Furthermore, the journal intends to revive a critical discussion on the auteurs, revisit the historiography of Italian cinema and celebrate the dynamic role played by new directors. The journal includes a book and film review section as well as notes on Italian film festivals abroad and international conference reports.

The profound transformation undergone by the rapidly expanding media environment under the impact of digital technology, has lead scholars in the field of media studies to elaborate new theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches to account for the complexities of a changing landscape of  convergence and hybridization. The boundaries between cinema and media as art forms and fields of inquiry are increasingly hybridized too. Taking into account this evolving scenario, the JICMS provides an international arena for critical engagement with a wider range of issues related to the current media environment. The journal welcomes in particular contributions that discuss any aspects of Italian media production, distribution and consumption within national and transnational, social, political, economic and historical contexts.

Listserv Announcement

The Editorial Board of the JICMS is pleased to announce a new listserv. The list provides a space for announcements (publications, events, news, CFPs) and a forum for the scholarly discussion and debate of issues pertaining to the cinema and media (television, radio, digital, etc.) in Italy, including in its transnational and transmedia dimensions.  

To sign up for the Italian Cinema and Media Studies listserv, go to https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?SUBED1=ICMS&A=1. Once you have signed up, you will be able to receive and post information via email.

This forum welcomes students, scholars and professionals interested in fruitful exchanges pertaining to Italian cinema and media studies in the world. 

Thank you for joining us!

 


Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

NEW SECTION: Translations & Archival Notes Download

NEW SECTION: Doctoral Dissertations Download

Notes for Contributors Download

Special Issue: ‘Italy’s Souths and Islands in Film, Media and Visual Cultures (2000–22)’ Download

Special Issue: ‘Italian Ecomedia: Archaeologies, Theories, Perspectives’ Download


CALL FOR PAPERS 

Special Issue: ‘Italian Ecomedia: Archaeologies, Theories, Perspectives’

Guest editors: Alessia Cervini and Giacomo Tagliani, University of Palermo

In the last 25 years, the environmental humanities have gained a prominent position in academic research. Their core consists in providing historical, political and critical perspectives on topics traditionally pertaining to the STEM disciplines, such as extinction, species resurrection, biodiversity, rewilding, urban-wildland interfaces, land development and resource use (Hubbel and Ryan 2022), as specific questions emerging from the Anthropocene (Iovino and Opperman 2016; Emmet and Nye 2017). Reflecting on such topics from a humanities point of view means investigating their social and cultural implications (Morton 2010; Malm 2021), the narratives behind them, their political and semiotic effects and the imaginaries they elicit. It also creates beneficial interactions between established disciplinary domains such as philosophy, geography, history, literary and visual studies. Cinema and media studies are profoundly affected by this environmental turn, mainly from a thematic or a production studies perspective (Ingram 2000; Ivakhiv 2013). However, reflecting on the potentialities of images to create, broaden and develop specific aesthetic trajectories is a compelling task in understanding how the environmental question is transforming present audio-visual language and, in turn, how this very language could influence the environmental debate (Cubitt, Monani and Rust 2013).

This Special Issue of the Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies aims to foster a transdisciplinary dialogue about the different forms through which the vast domain of ‘green discourse’ has been tackled by Italian cinema and media from a critical–aesthetic perspective. Despite its alternate fortunes, the environmental question has a long history in national audio-visual production, beginning with the ‘miracolo economico’ (‘economic miracle’, 1958–63) as evidenced for instance by Ivens’s TV film L’Italia non è un paese povero (‘Italy is not a poor country’) (1960). It was developed in subsequent decades in both fiction and non-fiction productions, such as Ferreri’s Il seme dell’uomo (The Seed of Man) (1973), De Seta’s In Calabria (1993), and Vicari’s documentary Il mio paese (My Country) (2006). Recently, some important scholarly contributions have started to consistently investigate this history (Past 2019), which, however, remains to be fully explored in terms of its aesthetic, political, theoretical and critical implications.

From this point of view, the Italian case can be considered exemplary for several reasons (Iovino, Cesaretti and Past 2018). First, Italian cinema has developed a long and original tradition in the depiction of and reflection on landscape, at least since neorealism (Bernardi 2002), as evidenced by films such as Rossellini’s Paisà (Paisan) (1946), Antonioni’s Il deserto rosso (Red Desert) (1964), and Frammartino’s Il buco (The Hole) (2021). Second, from at least the 1960s, Italy has conferred great yet ambivalent relevance to the environment, something that is both praised as a key asset due to its unique conditions and irremediably wasted, making it a place generating categories for investigating other experiences in other places (Iovino 2016). Media have widely contributed to this relevance, as testified by Ghirri’s Paesaggio italiano (‘Italian landscape’) (1980–89), Quilici’s L’Italia vista dal cielo (‘Italy seen from the sky’) (1966–78) or TV programmes such as Geo (1984–present). Third, as a result of specific historical, geographical and cultural conditions (e.g. ‘failed modernity’ or the north–south divide), Italy has developed an inner diversity that has shaped the relationship between subjects and environment in ways that are different from other countries (Armiero 2021). This diversity has been a recurrent issue for audio-visual objects dealing with the Italian landscape, as demonstrated for instance by the TV programme Meraviglie: La penisola dei tesori (‘Wonders: Treasure peninsula’) (2018–22) or by the recent editorial project Paesaggio Italia (‘Landscape Italy’) (2022) by National Geographic and la Repubblica.

Within such a methodological framework, this call for papers invites contributions that can address this topic through two different approaches. First, we welcome examples that can contribute to starting an ‘archaeology’ of environmentalism and sustainability in Italian film and media of the twentieth century. Contributors are invited to submit proposals about specific case studies seeking to identify topics linked to ecocriticism across Italian visual culture. The aim is to start creating an atlas that critically collects the visual signs of the Anthropocene, highlighting the role of these objects in the narratives and society of the period or their relevance for the present collective imaginary. Second, contributors are encouraged to propose broader reflections about the theoretical specificity of Italian film and media for the field of the environmental humanities. In this case, proposals should deal with theoretical and methodological questions addressing the role of Italian visual studies in contributing to a more accurate definition of this new interdisciplinary field of research, as well as the importance of the environmental humanities in redesigning the trajectories, objects and priorities of Italian studies.

The Special Issue is conceived as a first survey of investigations concerning the particular aesthetics of sustainability as developed by audio-visual objects and practices. Given the heterogeneous set of questions and perspectives arising from this topic, the call welcomes proposals from different disciplinary approaches (such as film and media studies, environmental studies, critical theory, postcolonial studies, semiotics, aesthetics), including analyses of different media formats (such as cinema, television, new and digital media, videoart). The guest editors welcome submissions that cover, but are not limited to, the following media, subjects and topics:

  • Documentaries dealing with climate change or sustainable practices. How have climate struggles been depicted in non-fiction production? What forms, genres, tropes and narratives have been employed? How have documentary films narrated sustainability and its broader environmental, economic, social, political implications?
  • Feature films narrating particular relationships between subjects and environment. What has been the role of the landscape in shaping the Italian audio-visual narratives? Is it possible to detect the signs of a concern for the irreversible transformation of the landscape during and after the economic miracle in Italian cinema?
  • TV programmes about nature and the environment. How is nature depicted in television? What rhetoric is employed in conveying a particular image of the environment and the landscape?
  • New media and video activist practices representing and disseminating exemplary experiences of resistance and resilience. Can video be a fundamental instrument for climate struggles? Is it something only belonging to the present, or is it possible to trace a history of this relationship? Are forms and formats somehow connected with the topic addressed?
  • Ecology and sustainability. Are there specific relationships between media ecology (Postman 1985) and media sustainability (Starosielski and Walker 2016)? To what extent do media help us in connecting the theoretical and political meanings of these two terms?
  • Topics of denunciation. Are there recurrent narrative and visual strategies to expose the damage to the environment caused by industrialization or criminality?
  • Topics of magnification. How have the beauty of nature and the landscape been portrayed by Italian audio-visual media?
  • Imagining of the future. Are there examples within the history of Italian visual culture that attempt to ‘premediate’ (Grusin 2011) future relationship between humans and the environment? What are the most important concerns emerging in these images?
  • Have there been authors in the audio-visual field whose work consistently engages with environmental issues? What are the distinctive aesthetic features of their approach that make them exemplary from any perspective?
  • Periods and movements. Are there periods or movements within film and TV history that have specifically dealt with environmental issues? What is their most important heritage for other periods or experiences, in Italy or abroad?
  • Are there privileged genres in the audio-visual field dealing with environmental issues? Is ecocriticism a genre per se?
  • How do media practices affect material conditions of living in terms of social, economic and cultural sustainability within given communities? What is the role of film festivals and exhibitions in spreading a particular idea of sustainability in practical and aesthetic terms?

Please, submit a 500-word proposal in English of original and unpublished research outlining the topic, approach and theoretical bases, together with a filmography and bibliography, and a bio-note of about 150 words with a detailed list of publications to Prof. Alessia Cervini (alessia.cerviniATunipa.it) and Prof. Giacomo Tagliani (giacomo.taglianiATunipa.it), by 5 September 2022. The outcome of the selection process will be communicated by 15 September 2022. Authors of the selected proposals will be invited to submit full-length articles by 8 January 2023 for double-blind peer-review. Authors will be notified of the results of the peer-review by 15 March 2023.

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CALL FOR PAPERS 

Special Issue: ‘Italy’s Souths and Islands in Film, Media and Visual Cultures (2000–22)’ 

Guest-editors:  

Marco Benoît Carbone (Brunel University, UK) and Giovanna Summerfield (Auburn University, USA) 

Proposal submission by 15 September 2022   

Italy’s ‘Souths’ (including the southern regions of the peninsula and the islands, Sicily and Sardinia) as social, historical and cultural realities have been variously refracted, represented and re-constructed in national and global media cultures. Internal and external gazes have been producing types, tropes and stereotypes, whether by conflating differences in a singular Southern commonplace or by sketching regional chronotopes (Bakhtin 1981) and heterotopias (Foucault 1984). Since Italy’s Unification, geographical and historical circumstances have been generating public and academic debates on the political, social, economic, and cultural realities and the representations of the multifaceted assemblage of il Meridione/il Mezzogiorno and its ‘Southern Question’ (Gramsci 1926; Barbagallo 2013). 

Such articulations and ensuing debates have found space into traditional and emerging forms over the past two decades, marked by the mainstreaming of the internet, social networks and novel forms of digitized, post-cinematic and screen media, as well as global crises and transformations and the rise of momentous equity movements. This calls for further theorization and analyses of the notions of the Italian Souths in global cinema and media ecologies. Focusing on continuities as well as transformations of themes of Italian Southern-ness over the past two decades, this Special Issue calls for interventions on media forms and modes that include cinema, commercials, documentaries, fiction, advertising, web series, social networks and media platforms, digital games and streaming. 

Addressing manifold mediated expressions in relation to their underpinning social and cultural realities, the issue seeks to address gazes and voices both on and from these Souths as well as diverse epistemic frameworks, geographies of knowledge, genealogies of power, and maps of language (Urban et al. 2012) that emerge in media production and consumption and among audiences and communities, including distinct areas of scholarship. We hope to open up a multidisciplinary field of discussion (including film, cinema, screen media, visual cultures, Italian, historical, and media and cultural studies), welcoming contributions on local, national and global narratives and images of ‘Italian Southern-ness’, and fostering interconnections between the communities of Italianx and Italianistx

This Special Issue aims to assess with nuance and attention for contextuality and complexity both the starkly simplistic and the more multifaceted or ambiguous representations of Italy’s Souths in their relation with their social realities (Cassano 2010) and more broadly with Italy-as-South in relation to Europe, ‘the West’ and the Mediterranean (Chakrabarty 2000; Chambers 2008; Bouchard and Ferme 2016), via an interdisciplinary investigation on their narratives in recent and emerging media forms. 

This brings up a series of complex open questions: 

  • What do the category of the ‘South’ and its mediations imply and for whom? 
  • Where do we draw a line to define Italy’s Souths? 
  • Does the Italian South exude any defining aesthetic and perceptive qualities? 
  • How does Southern-ness relate to nationalism and italianità in the media?
  • Does the notion of ‘the South’ essentialize diverse regional experiences or encapsulate/represent a politically and transversally fruitful category? 
  • What has been the role of film commissions (Zagarrio 2012) in challenging or reaffirming traditional or global commonplaces? 
  • How should we approach Italy’s Souths from the perspective of subaltern, global, postcolonial, subaltern and Mediterraneanism studies (Gramsci 1926; Said 1978, 1993; Spivak 1988; Herzfeld 1987; Appadurai 1996)? 
  • How can we apply theorizations about Southern Thought (Cassano 2000), Southernism (Bertellini 2010), the ‘cursed’ South (Teti 2011), Mediterraneanism (Tedesco 2017) and Southern landscape (Giordano 2022) to diverse processes and objects? 
  • What role should the South play in queering, decolonizing and re-imagining the nation, addressing its historical racialization and traditional associations with patriarchy? 
  • How does the South change, as seen from different perspectives, e.g. areas of migration from which ‘Italy’ is variously seen and constructed? 
  • How do diverse experiences from the fields of Italian studies from across the globe frame views and judgements about the South’s issues and representations? 

Such complexities call for research that will complicate the ‘good/bad’ dichotomies and blend theory and empirical analysis, paying attention to the persistence of traditional and newly evolving representations of the South, including: its representation as ‘naturally’ made for tourist consumption and associations with folklore (De Martino 1961, 1973) and ‘authenticity’ as well as with the bugbears of indolence, corruption and criminality; its images as a land plagued by unemployment and backwardness, including in films like Benvenuti al Sud (Miniero 2010); the South as persistently backward and denied of coevalness, e.g. in commercials like Calabria, Terra mia (Muccino 2020); and the persistence of regionalisms, often through irony, humour or sarcasm, in the media, including on YouTube, in memes and in TikTok videos addressing ‘differences between North and South Italy’. 

Contributions may focus on issues that include, but are not limited to: 

  • Southern landscapes, geographies, cultures and characters on screen; 
  • The Souths as topoi in diverse cinematic/media genres (Summerfield 2020);
  • Italy’s questione meridionale (‘Southern Question’), film commissions and accented media; 
  • Local, national and global tensions in representing and consuming Italy’s Souths; 
  • Mediatized social, cultural and political narratives and public histories of Southern Italy; 
  • Approaches to Southern cinema and media production and consumption; 
  • Representational and aesthetic regimes of film and mediatized Southern-ness; 
  • The Souths’ enduring folklorization and issues related to its heritagization; 
  • Heritage/literary/cinematic tourism and the touristisation of the Souths;
  • Southern peripheries as consumable paradises for ‘1-Euro’ house bargains; 
  • Ironic, humorous and farcical representations of the Souths; 
  • The Souths as lands of Otherness and wilderness in horror, fantasy and drama; 
  • The sublime, picturesque and ‘magic’ South and the South-as-mythology (Carbone 2022); 
  • The South, Southerners and the Nation in digital games, web series and social media; 
  • Narratives of crime-ridden Souths and Southern Italian mafias on screen and in scholarship; 
  • Images of Southern migration and migrants and the terroni cliché; 
  • Speaking from/on behalf of the South: insiderists and non-Southern auteures/directors; 
  • The South-as-Mediterranean, as-Europe, and in relation to the Global Souths; 
  • Hyphenated Southern Italian identities in cinema and the media; 
  • Southern-ness racializations and relations to Whiteness, Blackness and BIPOC+ issues; 
  • LGBTQI+ identities from Italy’s Souths and intersectional approaches to the Souths; 
  • Postcolonial, independent and militant Southern cinema. 

    Please submit a 500-word proposal with a detailed bibliography and filmography/media references. Also, please send a 150-word biographical note to the guest editors Marco Benoît Carbone and Giovanna Summerfield at italiansouths@gmail.com by 15 September 2022. 

Proposals of articles should be entirely original and unpublished, should not be under consideration by any other publisher, should not have been published previously even in part by any other publication, and should not appear in blogs or other online sites. Proposals of English translations or edited versions of previously published works will not be considered. 

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Call for Contributions – ‘Doctoral Dissertations’ column

Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies

The Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies invites contributions for a new column about recent doctoral dissertations. The column is designed to keep scholars and teachers up to date regarding the defence and publication of graduate research into any aspect of Italian cinema and/or media studies while promoting access to an emerging generation of international scholarship. Depending on the number of submissions, the column may publish up to three entries per issue. Proposals are welcome for dissertations defended during the past two years.

Entries will appear in the form of short dissertation abstracts and will include the following information: dissertation title, author name, current e-mail address, degree-granting department and school, advisor name and affiliation, ISBN or equivalent identification number, abstract (500 words maximum) and biographical note (100 words maximum). Abstracts will be written in a way that focuses directly on the historical and/or theoretical intervention, including presentation of primary sources, methodology and conclusions. Entries for dissertations written in languages other than English are encouraged, and the column curator will work together with international authors where translation is required.

 

For inquiries and submissions, write to Jim Carter (jimrc@umich.edu).

 

Jim Carter holds a Ph.D. in Italian from the University of Michigan and is currently working on a book about industrial culture at Olivetti (1930s through 1950s). His essays on cultural studies have appeared in international publications like Modern Italy and Italian Culture, and he is the co-editor (with Carlo Baghetti and Lorenzo Marmo) of the forthcoming volume Italian Industrial Literature and Film (Peter Lang, Italian Modernities Series). In 2018–19, he was a fellow of the American Academy in Rome.

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Call for Papers

Please download and read the full Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (JICMS) Notes for Contributors before submitting to the journal.

JICMS is an English-language forum for theoretical, methodological and critical debate on Italian film and media production, reception and consumption. It provides a platform for dialogue between academics, filmmakers and cinema and media professionals. This peer-reviewed journal invites submissions of scholarly articles relating to the artistic features, cultural themes, international influence and history of Italian film and media. Furthermore, the journal intends to revive a critical discussion on the auteurs, revisit the historiography of Italian cinema and celebrate the dynamic role played by new directors. The journal includes a book and film review section as well as notes on Italian film festivals abroad and international conference reports.

The profound transformation undergone by the rapidly expanding media environment under the impact of digital technology has lead scholars in the field of media studies to elaborate new theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches to account for the complexities of a changing landscape of convergence and hybridization. The boundaries between cinema and media as art forms and fields of inquiry are increasingly hybridized too. Taking into account this evolving scenario, JICMS provides an international arena for critical engagement with a wider range of issues related to the current media environment. The journal welcomes in particular contributions that discuss any aspect of Italian media production, distribution and consumption within national and transnational, social, political, economic and historical contexts.

Within the realm of a post-national and trans-cultural debate, the purpose of JICMS is to refer to Italy as the unifying site for a contemporary discussion on translocal cinema. The journal aims to elaborate a multifaceted definition of Italian cinema, transcending geo-ethnic land and sea borders and moving away from merely celebratory local cinematic experiences. Therefore, the journal also devotes attention to Italophone filmmakers and diasporic, accented or exilic cinema. JICMS is also interested in the artistic intersections between Italian and other international cinemas.

JICMS also invites submissions that examine experimental cinema, video art, short films, long/short feature and documentary animation, original and adapted screenplays, film music (songs and scores), issues of stardom and reception studies. The professional contributions of screenplay writers, art directors, cinematographers, film editors, costume designers and make-up artists are also potential subject areas for submissions.

Interested contributors should send: (1) a 500-word abstract outlining the topic, approach and theoretical bases; (2) the relevant bibliography and filmography and (3) 200-word biographical notes (listing academic publications) to the editor.

Journal contributors will receive a free PDF copy of their final work upon publication. Print copies of the journal may also be purchased by contributors at half price.

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

Editorial Board

Sarah Annunziato
The University of Virginia, USA

Paola Bonifazio
The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Flavia Brizio-Skov
University of Tennessee, USA

Clodagh Brook
Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Ireland

Frank Burke
Queen’s University, Canada

Marco Benoît Carbone
Brunel University, UK

Jim Carter
Boston University, USA

Monica Jansen
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Alfio Leotta
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Bernadette Luciano
University of Auckland, New Zealand

Annachiara Mariani
University of Tennessee, USA

Alex Marlow-Mann
University of Kent, UK

Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
Princeton University, USA

Mary Ann McDonald Carolan
Fairfield University, USA

Mariano Mestman
University of Buenos Aires-Conicet, Argentina

Áine O'Healy
Loyola Marymount University, USA

Laura Rascaroli
University College Cork, Ireland

John David Rhodes
University of Cambridge, UK

Grace Russo Bullaro
City University of New York, Lehman College, USA

Roberta Tabanelli
The University of Missouri-Columbia, USA

Maria Bonaria Urban
Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, Italy

Gaoheng Zhang
University of British Columbia, Canada

Advisory Board

Marcia Landy
University of Pittsburgh, USA

Geoffrey Nowell-Smith
Queen Mary University of London, UK

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

 
ANVUR Scientific Journal and Class A, Areas 10 and 10C1 and 14 and 14C2
 
CNKI
 
Emerging Sources Citation Index
 
ERIH PLUS
 
FIAF (International Federation of Film Archives)
 
Film and Television Literature Index
 
Film and Television Literature Index (with FT)
 
International Index to Film Periodicals
 
MLA
 
Scopus
 
UGC-CARE
 
Ulrich's Periodicals Directory

Contents

  • Volume (10): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2022


Contents

  • Volume (10): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2022


Contents

  • Volume (10): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2022


Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2021


Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2021


Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2021


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2020


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2020


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2020


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (1&2)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2012


Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Ziyu Cheng
University of Toronto, Canada

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Rachel Grasso
University of Toronto, Canada

Daniele Iannucci
University of Toronto, Canada

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