Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (Journal)

ISSN 20477368 , ONLINE ISSN 20477376

Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies is a fully peer-reviewed, English-language journal, which explores Italian cinema and media as sites of crossing, allowing critical discussion of the work of filmmakers, artists in the film industry and media professionals. The journal intends to revive a critical discussion on the auteurs, celebrate new directors and accented cinema and examine Italy as a geo-cultural locus for contemporary debate on translocal cinema.

NEW SECTION ANNOUNCEMENT: Translations & Archival Notes



Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies is an English-language forum for theoretical, methodological and critical debate on Italian film and media production, reception and consumption. It provides a platform for dialogue between academics, filmmakers, cinema and media professionals. This peer-reviewed journal invites submissions of scholarly articles relating to the artistic features, cultural themes, international influence and history of Italian film and media. Furthermore, the journal intends to revive a critical discussion on the auteurs, revisit the historiography of Italian cinema and celebrate the dynamic role played by new directors. The journal includes a book and film review section as well as notes on Italian film festivals abroad and international conference reports.

The profound transformation undergone by the rapidly expanding media environment under the impact of digital technology, has lead scholars in the field of media studies to elaborate new theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches to account for the complexities of a changing landscape of  convergence and hybridization. The boundaries between cinema and media as art forms and fields of inquiry are increasingly hybridized too. Taking into account this evolving scenario, the JICMS provides an international arena for critical engagement with a wider range of issues related to the current media environment. The journal welcomes in particular contributions that discuss any aspects of Italian media production, distribution and consumption within national and transnational, social, political, economic and historical contexts.

 


Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

NEW SECTION: Translations & Archival Notes Download

NEW SECTION: Doctoral Dissertations Download

Notes for Contributors Download

CFP: ‘Giallo! The Long History of Italian Television Crime Drama’ Download

Abstract Deadline: 30 April 2021


CFP: ‘Past and Present Intersections among Italian, Russian, Soviet and Post-Socialist Cinemas and Media’ Download

CFP: 'Intersezioni passate e presenti tra i Cinema e i Media italiani, russi, sovietici e dei paesi post-socialisti' Download


Special Issue Call for Papers

‘International Students at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia in Rome,

1935–2020: A History to Be Written’

Editor: Flavia Laviosa

Submission date: 31 May 2021

The Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia in Rome (CSC) was founded in 1935 with the intention of strengthening the national film industry and returning Italian cinema to its early role as world leader. This meant using cinema as ‘the most powerful weapon’, as Mussolini claimed. Despite its nationalistic mission, the CSC practised a progressive admissions policy, accepting numerous international students, even though the modern concept of multicultural education was not part of fascist Italy. Since its opening, the CSC has admitted about 500 international students from six continents (Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, Latin America and North America) and approximately 100 countries, amounting to 13.16 per cent of the total 3800 enrolled students.

Who were these students and why did they choose the CSC? Which international institutions promoted and facilitated their studies in Italy? Why were there students from Germany and Eastern Europe in the pre-Second World War years and why so many from Greece, Arab nations, the United States and Latin America in the 1950s and 1960s? Alfredo Baldi provides some answers to these historical issues in his interview ‘Six continents at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia in Rome’ (JICMS 9:2, 2021 pp. 261–70). The interview is available at: JICMS 9.2.

Starting in 1947, both the CSC’s first post-war special commissioner, Umberto Barbaro, and his successor, Vice President Luigi Chiarini, intellectuals with a vast international culture, led the film school. Aware of the need to open the CSC to the world, they implemented recruitment policies geared towards increasing internationalization of its student body. The CSC’s new leadership valued diversity as a paramount creative contribution to the arts of filmmaking: their visionary admissions policy, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, aimed to welcome young talents of different ethnic origins, religions, ideological orientations and political affiliations.

Interest in the CSC in those years can be attributed both to the fascination with Italian neorealism and to the high reputation of the filmmakers who taught at the CSC, including Luigi Chiarini, Pietro Germi, Alessandro Blasetti and Luigi Zampa. To its multicultural, multiethnic and multilingual student population, the CSC offered innovative curricula integrating theory and practice in ten different specializations: Acting, Directing, Photography, Set Design, Costume Design, Screenwriting, Sound Production, Editing, Production and, since 1983, Film Animation. The CSC’s directors intended to launch a world-school that would furnish the grounds for fruitful intellectual exchanges, artistic collaborations and professional connections between Italian and international students while disseminating Italian cinematic styles that would consequently influence world cinema.

To this end, the article ‘International students at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia in Rome: 1935–2020. A history to be written’, co-authored by Flavia Laviosa (Wellesley College, USA), Alfredo Baldi (Comitato Scientifico Federazione Italiana dei Cineclub/FEDIC, Italy), Jim Carter (University of Michigan, USA), and Diego Bonelli (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand) includes a complete list of the CSC’s international alumni from 1935 to 2020 in Directing, Set Design and Photography (JICMS 9:2, 2021, pp. 175–209). The article is available at: JICMS 9.2

Drawn from archival and digital sources, the list allows scholars to study the work of these international students within a transnational framework and assess how their Italian training affected their artistry and professional craft. This type of research could broaden our understanding of whether and how the CSC’s Italian cinematic education impacted world cinema.

Link to the list of international students in Directing, Set Design and Photography: Click here to download

Within the transnational framework of Rome as the place where Italian cinematic education began and developed and the hypotheses on the CSC as a beacon of art and diversity, the intent of this CFP is manifold. First, we wish to rediscover and investigate the influence of Italian cinema education while unveiling unexplored trajectories across global film productions. Second, we wish to explore the cross-national dialogues and trans-generational exchanges that have taken place at the CSC since 1935, including their influences across global film productions. Finally, we intend to revisit this history from the perspectives of international artists themselves, through their accomplishments and by looking at what they might have contributed in giving back to Italy. Our goal is to recompose these intersections in a multi-directional, multi-modal and multi-layered set of interactive historical, geographical and artistic maps.

In sum, with this CFP we are committed to exploring the diffuse effects of the CSC educational polycentrism on the work of artists worldwide who studied at the CSC and who met with subsequent professional success. By researching the work of these artists, we aim to retrace threads that would bring their accomplishments full circle with the origin of their education at the CSC.

Contributions include, but are not limited to:

-          theoretical and historical articles

-          critical articles

-          film and book reviews

-          critical biographies of the artists

-          interviews with the artists

-          bio-filmographies.

 

Proposals should be written in British English, should be entirely original and unpublished and should not be under consideration by any other publisher.

Interviews, independent and experimental artist biographies, film and book reviews, conference and film festival reports are considered.

Proposals of English translations or edited versions of previously published works will not be considered.

Abstracts of articles should be sent to the editor Flavia Laviosa (flaviosa@wellesley.edu) by 31 May 2021, and should include the following information:

1)  A 300-word abstract outlining:

  1. the topic
  2. critical approach
  3. theoretical and historical basis of the proposed article.

The abstract should clearly state the goals of the article and provide a cohesive description of the objective of the argument. In addition to a 300-word abstract, authors should send:

2)      Relevant bibliography and filmography

3)      A 150-word biographical note followed by a detailed list of academic publications.

The accepted proposals will be notified by 15 June; completed articles should be sent by 15 October. Authors will be notified of the results of the double-blind peer-review by 15 December 2021. Selected articles will be considered for publication in a Special Issue of JICMS.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

‘Past and Present Intersections among Italian, Russian, Soviet and Post-Socialist Cinemas and Media’

Co-Editors

Flavia Laviosa, Wellesley College

Anastasia Grusha, Lomonosov Moscow State University

 

Proposal submission by 31 May 2021 

 

Italian cinema and media are translational and transnational. They are imported and exported, transferred, translated, adopted, adapted and re-interpreted. They move in multiple directions and constantly intersect with other filmmaking and media cultures, in particular with cinema and media traditions from Central and Eastern Europe, Russia and the former Soviet Union. The seminal work published in the bilingual (Italian and Russian) volume Russia-Italia: Un secolo di cinema (ABCDesign, 2020), edited by Olga Strada and Claudia Olivieri, sponsored by the Italian Embassy in Moscow and presented both at the 77th edition of the Venice Film Festival and at the 42nd edition of the International Film Festival in Moscow in fall 2020, is the first and largest collection of essays, interviews, testimonials, photographs and unpublished documents, exploring the artistic, cultural and historical relationship between Russia and Italy starting from early cinema.

Within such an intersectional framework, scholars are invited to engage in new methodologically critical approaches to Italian cinema and media in order to recover overlooked connections and re-compose them in historic and aesthetic maps, and also to examine commercial and distribution relations marked by cross-national dialogues and trans-generational exchanges.

The purpose of this themed issue of the Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (JICMS) is to explore the encounter between artistic geographies and academic geometries delineated by the role that Italian cinema plays and has played in Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans, Russia and various post-Soviet states (like the Central Asia countries, the Baltic states, the Caucasus, etc.) and East Germany, during and after the Soviet period, as well as in cooperation opportunities between the film industries of these countries.

This is a largely under-researched area of studies and with this CFP, JICMS attempts to fill in such an academic void.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Global neorealisms: dialogues among Italy, Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans, Russia and various post-Soviet states (like the Central Asia countries, the Baltic states, the Caucasus, etc.) and East Germany;
  • Reception of neorealist films in Soviet and post-socialist countries;
  • Links between Italian political cinema and media in these regions;
  • Italian popular genres in these geographical areas: commedia all’italiana, television shows and series;
  • The reception of Italian cinema and media in this vast geographical region and vice versa;
  • Transnational stardom in cinema and television;
  • Transnational co-productions and the adaptation to the needs of the respective national markets of film and television productions;
  • Italian film festivals in the aforementioned states;
  • Soviet–Italian film institutional exchanges;
  • Geopolitics in Italian cinema and media in these countries;
  • Soviet–Italian co-productions;
  • Representations of Italy in Russian media;
  • Study of institutional powers like Rai, Mediaset, Sky and variously affiliated production/distribution companies that embody and entertain strong relationships with domestic and international power centres.

Proposals should be written in British English, should be entirely original and unpublished, and should not be under consideration by any other publisher.

Interviews, independent and experimental artist biographies, film and book reviews, conference and film festival reports are considered.

Proposals of English translations or edited versions of previously published works will not be considered.

Abstracts should be sent to the co-editors Flavia Laviosa (flaviosa@wellesley.edu) and Anastasia Grusha (anastasia_grusha@mail.ru) by 31 May 2021, and should include the following information:

1)  A 500-word abstract outlining:

  1. The topic
  2. Critical approach
  3. Theoretical and historical basis of the proposed article.

The abstract should clearly state the goals of the article and provide a cohesive description of the objective of the argument. In addition to a 500-word abstract, authors should send:

2)      Relevant bibliography and filmography

3)      A 200-word biographical note followed by a detailed list of academic publications.

The accepted proposals will be notified by 15 June; completed articles should be sent by 30 September. Authors will be notified of the results of the double-blind peer-review by 30 November 2021.

Dr Flavia Laviosa is senior lecturer in the Department of Italian Studies and in the Cinema and Media Studies Program, Wellesley College, United States. She is the founder and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (Intellect), and of the book series Trajectories of Italian Cinema and Media Studies (Intellect and Chicago University Press). https://www.wellesley.edu/italian/faculty/laviosa

Dr Anastasia Grusha is associate professor at the Faculty of Journalism, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia. She is also chair of the Communication in Post- and Neo-Authoritarian Societies Working Group of the IAMCR. http://www.journ.msu.ru/eng/staff/vicedeans.php?sphrase_id=3037523 

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Intersezioni passate e presenti tra

i Cinema e i Media italiani, russi, sovietici e dei paesi post-socialisti

Curatrici

Flavia Laviosa, Wellesley College

Anastasia Grusha, Lomonosov Moscow State University

 

Presentazione delle proposte entro il 31 maggio 2021 

 

Il cinema e i media italiani sono traslazionali e transnazionali. Sono importati ed esportati, trasferiti, tradotti, adottati, adattati e reinterpretati. Si muovono in molteplici direzioni e si intersecano costantemente con altre culture cinematografiche e mediali, in particolare con le tradizioni cinematografiche e mediali proprie dell’Europa Centrale e Orientale, della Russia e dell’ex-Unione Sovietica. Il lavoro seminale pubblicato nel volume bilingue (in italiano e russo) Russia-Italia. Un secolo di cinema (ABCDesign 2020), curato da Olga Strada e Claudia Olivieri, sostenuto dall’ambasciata italiana a Mosca, e presentato sia alla 77esima edizione della Mostra Internazionale d’Arte Cinematografica di Venezia che alla 42esima edizione del Festival Cinematografico Internazionale di Mosca nell’autunno 2020, è la prima e più ampia raccolta di saggi, interviste, testimonianze, fotografie e documenti inediti che esplorano la relazione artistica, culturale e storica tra Russia e Italia a partire dal cinema muto.

All’interno di un contesto così intersettoriale, gli studiosi sono invitati ad adottare nuovi approcci metodologicamente critici al cinema e ai media italiani, allo scopo di recuperare connessioni trascurate e ricomporle in mappe storiche ed estetiche, e anche di esaminare le relazioni commerciali e di distribuzione contrassegnate da dialoghi cross-nazionali e scambi trans-generazionali.

La finalità di questo numero tematico del Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies (JICMS) è di esplorare l’incontro tra geografie artistiche e geometrie accademiche delineato dal ruolo che il cinema italiano ha e ha svolto nell’Europa Centrale e Orientale, nei Balcani, in Russia e in vari stati post-sovietici (come i Paesi dell’Asia centrale, gli Stati baltici, il Caucaso, ecc.) e la Germania dell’Est, durante e dopo il periodo sovietico, così come nelle opportunità di cooperazione tra le industrie cinematografiche di questi Paesi.

Questo è un campo di studio poco esplorato e con questa CFP, il JICMS prova a colmare un tale vuoto accademico.

I temi includono, ma non sono limitati a:

  • Neorealismi globali: dialoghi tra Italia, Europa Centrale e Orientale, Balcani, Russia e vari stati post-sovietici (come i Paesi dell’Asia centrale, gli Stati baltici, il Caucaso, ecc.) e la Germania dell’Est.
  • Ricezione dei film neorealisti nei Paesi sovietici e post-socialisti.
  • Legami tra il cinema politico italiano e i media in queste regioni.
  • Generi popolari tra le due aree geografiche: commedia all’italiana, programmi televisivi e serie.
  • La ricezione del cinema e dei media italiani in questa vasta area geografica, e viceversa.
  • Divismo transnazionale nel cinema e nella televisione.
  • Co-produzioni transnazionali e l’adattamento ai bisogni dei rispettivi mercati nazionali delle produzioni cinematografiche e televisive.
  • I festival di cinema italiano negli stati su indicati.
  • Gli scambi cinematografici istituzionali tra Unione Sovietica e Italia.
  • Geopolitica nel cinema e nei media italiani nei paesi su indicati.
  • Co-produzioni Italo-sovietiche.
  • Rappresentazioni dell’Italia nei media russi.
  • Studio di potenze istituzionali come la Rai, Mediaset, Sky e varie case di produzione/distribuzione affiliate che incarnano e intrattengono forti relazioni con centri di potere domestici e internazionali.

È necessario che le proposte vengano scritte in Inglese britannico e che siano interamente originali e inedite, che non siano inoltre state presentate ad altri editori né pubblicate precedentemente, anche in parte, su qualsiasi altra pubblicazione.

Si prendono in considerazione interviste, resoconti di eventi, biografie di artisti indipendenti e sperimentali, recensioni di film e libri.

Le proposte di traduzioni in inglese o versioni modificate di lavori precedentemente pubblicati non saranno prese in considerazione.

Gli abstract dovranno essere inviati alle curatrici Flavia Laviosa (flaviosa@wellesley.edu) e Anastasia Grusha (anastasia_grusha@mail.ru) entro il 31 maggio 2021, e dovranno contenere le seguenti informazioni:

  • Abstract di 500 parole che delinei:
  1. L’argomento.
  2. L’approccio critico.
  3. Le basi teoriche e storiche dell’articolo proposto.

L’abstract dovrà dichiarare chiaramente gli obiettivi dell’articolo e fornire una descrizione coerente della finalità dell’argomentazione. In aggiunta all’abstract di 500 parole, gli autori dovranno inviare:

  • Bibliografia e filmografia rilevanti.
  • Una nota biografica di 200 parole seguita da una lista dettagliata delle pubblicazioni accademiche.

Le proposte accettate verranno comunicate entro il 15 giugno; gli articoli completati dovranno essere inviati entro il 30 settembre. Gli esiti del referaggio verranno comunicati agli autori entro il 30 novembre 2021.

Flavia Laviosa è Docente nel Department of Italian Studies e nel Cinema and Media Program del Wellesley College, Stati Uniti. È inoltre fondatrice e direttrice del Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies (Intellect), e della collana Trajectories of Italian Cinema and Media Studies (Intellect e Chicago UP). https://www.wellesley.edu/italian/faculty/laviosa

Anastasia Grusha è Professore Associato alla Facoltà di Giornalismo dell’Università Statale Lomonosov di Mosca, Russia. È inoltre Presidentessa del Communication in Post- and Neo-Authoritarian Societies Working Group del IAMCR. http://www.journ.msu.ru/eng/staff/vicedeans.php?sphrase_id=3037523

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Special Issue: ‘Giallo! The Long History of Italian Television Crime Drama’

Edited by Luca Barra (Università di Bologna) and Valentina Re (Link Campus, Rome)

Most of the Italian television drama able to circulate internationally belongs to the multifaceted crime genre, both in some sparse examples from the past and in growing contemporary productions (from premium channels and digital platforms, to public service and commercial broadcasters). However, for many decades, only a limited range of titles has been given scholarly attention, drawing a useful yet partial account of an otherwise dense and multilayered history. Moreover, exceptions have often been studied far more than the most conventional crime series in the ‘giallo’ spectrum: most police procedurals are deemed too formulaic, or too popular, to be distinguished. Therefore, this Special Issue intends to overcome these limits by focusing on the historical evolution of the crime genre inside the development of Italian television, from the early stages to the latest mainstream and niche successes, and by highlighting the many crime titles that have become familiar to large Italian audiences. 

Through the Italian crime drama and its evolution over the decades, an original history of Italian television and media can be easily outlined, where ‘giallo’ would often mark changes of pace, innovations, successes and failures. Already in the first twenty years of the so-called paleo-television and monopoly period, crime drama was facilitating the Italian ‘sceneggiato’s’ turn towards a medium-long seriality: the investigations of ‘tenente’ Sheridan (from 1959 to 1972, first with Giallo club. Invito al poliziesco and later with Ritorna il tenente Sheridan, Sheridan squadra omicidi and Le donne del tenente Sheridan) or Le inchieste del commissario Maigret (1964–72), starring Gino Cervi; or Nero Wolfe (1969–71). Further on, it was crime drama that marked the transition – even the lexical transition – from ‘sceneggiato’ to ‘fiction’, with the great success of La Piovra (1984–2001). It was crime television that punctuated the golden age of public service fiction in the late 1990s: Il maresciallo Rocca (1996–2008), Il commissario Montalbano (1999–present), La squadra (2000–07) and the reassuring Don Matteo (2000–present). It was crime drama that underlined the innovations of commercial networks: Distretto di polizia (2000–12), RIS. Delitti imperfetti (2005–09) and Squadra antimafia. Palermo oggi (2009–16). Once again, it was the crime genre that marked the arrival of premium original productions, first with Sky – Quo vadis, baby? (2008), Romanzo criminale. La serie (2008–10) and Gomorra. La serie (2014–present) – and later with Netflix – Suburra. La serie (2017–20). Lastly, crime is one of the main battlegrounds for the return of Rai and Mediaset competition, innovating genres and aesthetics and establishing global partnerships, with titles like Non uccidere (2015–18), Rocco Schiavone (2016–present), La porta rossa (2016–present), I bastardi di Pizzofalcone (2017–present), Maltese (2017), Il cacciatore (2018) and Il processo (2019). In Italy, as in many other countries like the United States, the United Kingdom and Scandinavia, the entire nation is reflected in the history of its TV crime drama, mixing the reverberations of a changing society – which experiences new tensions and conflicts in terms of economic insecurity, political uncertainty, family and gender norms – with formal experiments and the shared imageries of a long-lasting, rich and always new genre. 

The editors encourage submissions that cover, but are not limited to, the following subjects and topics: 

  1. The genre and its polymorphism. How has Italian TV, across its entire history, interpreted the many subgenres of ‘giallo’ (noir, police procedural, legal drama, detective story, crime, etc.)? How are these subgenres related to different periods, specific formats, channels and platforms? 
  1. The familiar hybridizations with comedy and melodrama. What are the strategies to ‘balance’ the roughness of crime in the Italian tradition? How have these interacted with the crime genre? 
  1. The less familiar hybridizations with other genres. How have popular genres like fantasy, the supernatural, gothic, science fiction and thriller impacted the ‘giallo’ traditions and innovations? 
  1. The geography of Italian crime. How have the places represented in the Italian ‘giallo’ changed in television history (centre vs. peripheries; urban vs. rural stories)? How have locations affected the narrative developments, the production and the national and global circulation of these series? 
  1. Literary adaptations and original productions. How has the frequent adaptation of literary investigators (i.e. Maigret, Nero Wolfe, Montalbano, etc.) influenced the narratives, characters, production and promotion strategies of Italian TV dramas? How do fully-original stories differ? 
  1. The Italian ‘giallo’ as a transmedial phenomenon. How have crime dramas hybridized languages, figures, characters and topics from different media, such as radio, comics and cinema? 
  1. Mainstream dramas and quality ‘giallo’. How has ‘quality’ or ‘complex’ TV impacted Italian crime by featuring ambiguous heroes and antiheroes, multiple storylines, unconventional locations and a sophisticated visual style? And what is the role of more traditional, mass-oriented crime? 
  1. From amateur to professional female investigators. How have crime dramas, from Laura Storm to Thou Shalt Not Kill’s Valeria Ferro, shown an increasingly strong interest in female detectives? How does this help us understand, question and renegotiate evolving gender and genre norms? 
  1. The reality and fiction of Italian ‘giallo’. How have Italian crime dramas reinterpreted or hinted at the news of ‘cronaca nera’, in a complex entanglement between unsolved cases and judiciary truths? In which ways has the recent explosion of serial true crime also impacted fictional series? 
  1. The international circulation of Italian crime. After the first success of La piovra, in recent years more and more national productions have met with foreign acclaim. What are the elements that facilitate this international circulation, and what are the effects on narratives and productions? 
  1. Italian ‘giallo’ and the past: national history and national memory. How has the Italian ‘giallo’ tradition been proven capable of turning our gaze on the past and addressing unresolved social and political conflict? How do ‘gialli’ contribute to a shared national memory of mysteries and traumas? 
  1. Italian ‘giallo’ and the present: social tensions and moral dilemmas. From financial issues to terrorism, from immigration to the ties between politics, corruption and organized crime, how has the contemporary crime drama contributed to narrating conflict and fear in our societies? 

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 30 April. Interested contributors should send the following materials to the guest editors Luca Barra, Università di Bologna (luca.barra@tunibo.it) and Valentina Re, Link Campus, Rome (v.re@tunilink.it): a 500 word abstract in English of original and unpublished articles, outlining the topic, approach and theoretical bases with a relevant bibliography and filmography; and a 200 word biographical note. The accepted proposals will be notified by 31 May; completed articles should be sent by 15 October for peer-review; authors will be notified of the results of the peer-review by 15 December 2021.

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Call for Contributions – ‘Doctoral Dissertations’ column

Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies

The Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies invites contributions for a new column about recent doctoral dissertations. The column is designed to keep scholars and teachers up to date regarding the defence and publication of graduate research into any aspect of Italian cinema and/or media studies while promoting access to an emerging generation of international scholarship. Depending on the number of submissions, the column may publish up to three entries per issue. Proposals are welcome for dissertations defended during the past two years.

Entries will appear in the form of short dissertation abstracts and will include the following information: dissertation title, author name, current e-mail address, degree-granting department and school, advisor name and affiliation, ISBN or equivalent identification number, abstract (500 words maximum) and biographical note (100 words maximum). Abstracts will be written in a way that focuses directly on the historical and/or theoretical intervention, including presentation of primary sources, methodology and conclusions. Entries for dissertations written in languages other than English are encouraged, and the column curator will work together with international authors where translation is required.

 

For inquiries and submissions, write to Jim Carter (jimrc@umich.edu).

 

Jim Carter holds a Ph.D. in Italian from the University of Michigan and is currently working on a book about industrial culture at Olivetti (1930s through 1950s). His essays on cultural studies have appeared in international publications like Modern Italy and Italian Culture, and he is the co-editor (with Carlo Baghetti and Lorenzo Marmo) of the forthcoming volume Italian Industrial Literature and Film (Peter Lang, Italian Modernities Series). In 2018–19, he was a fellow of the American Academy in Rome.

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Call for Papers

Please download and read the full Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (JICMS) Notes for Contributors before submitting to the journal.

JICMS is an English-language forum for theoretical, methodological and critical debate on Italian film and media production, reception and consumption. It provides a platform for dialogue between academics, filmmakers and cinema and media professionals. This peer-reviewed journal invites submissions of scholarly articles relating to the artistic features, cultural themes, international influence and history of Italian film and media. Furthermore, the journal intends to revive a critical discussion on the auteurs, revisit the historiography of Italian cinema and celebrate the dynamic role played by new directors. The journal includes a book and film review section as well as notes on Italian film festivals abroad and international conference reports.

The profound transformation undergone by the rapidly expanding media environment under the impact of digital technology has lead scholars in the field of media studies to elaborate new theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches to account for the complexities of a changing landscape of convergence and hybridization. The boundaries between cinema and media as art forms and fields of inquiry are increasingly hybridized too. Taking into account this evolving scenario, JICMS provides an international arena for critical engagement with a wider range of issues related to the current media environment. The journal welcomes in particular contributions that discuss any aspect of Italian media production, distribution and consumption within national and transnational, social, political, economic and historical contexts.

Within the realm of a post-national and trans-cultural debate, the purpose of JICMS is to refer to Italy as the unifying site for a contemporary discussion on translocal cinema. The journal aims to elaborate a multifaceted definition of Italian cinema, transcending geo-ethnic land and sea borders and moving away from merely celebratory local cinematic experiences. Therefore, the journal also devotes attention to Italophone filmmakers and diasporic, accented or exilic cinema. JICMS is also interested in the artistic intersections between Italian and other international cinemas.

JICMS also invites submissions that examine experimental cinema, video art, short films, long/short feature and documentary animation, original and adapted screenplays, film music (songs and scores), issues of stardom and reception studies. The professional contributions of screenplay writers, art directors, cinematographers, film editors, costume designers and make-up artists are also potential subject areas for submissions.

Interested contributors should send: (1) a 500-word abstract outlining the topic, approach and theoretical bases; (2) the relevant bibliography and filmography and (3) 200-word biographical notes (listing academic publications) to the editor.


Journal contributors will receive a free PDF copy of their final work upon publication. Print copies of the journal may also be purchased by contributors at half price.

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

Editorial Board

Sarah Annunziato
The University of Virginia, USA

Stefano Bona
University of South Australia, Australia

Flavia Brizio-Skov
University of Tennessee, USA

Clodagh Brook
Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Ireland

Frank Burke
Queen’s University, Canada

Marco Benoît Carbone
Brunel University, UK

Francesco Fiumara
Southeastern Louisiana University, USA

Danielle Hipkins
University of Exeter, UK

Monica Jansen
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Alfio Leotta
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Bernadette Luciano
University of Auckland, New Zealand

Alex Marlow-Mann
University of Kent, UK

Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
Princeton University, USA

Mary Ann McDonald Carolan
Fairfield University, USA

Mariano Mestman
University of Buenos Aires-Conicet, Argentina

Áine O'Healy
Loyola Marymount University, USA

Laura Rascaroli
University College Cork, Ireland

John David Rhodes
University of Cambridge, UK

Paolo Russo
Oxford Brookes University, UK

Grace Russo Bullaro
City University of New York, Lehman College, USA

Susanna Scarparo
The University of Sydney, Australia

Roberta Tabanelli
The University of Missouri-Columbia, USA

Maria Bonaria Urban
Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, Italy

Gaoheng Zhang
University of British Columbia, Canada

Advisory Board

Marcia Landy
University of Pittsburgh, USA

Geoffrey Nowell-Smith
Queen Mary University of London, UK

Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

 
ANVUR Scientific Journal and Class A, Areas 10 and 10C1 and 14 and 14C2
 
Emerging Sources Citation Index
 
ERIH PLUS
 
FIAF (International Federation of Film Archives)
 
Film and Television Literature Index
 
Film and Television Literature Index (with FT)
 
International Index to Film Periodicals
 
MLA
 
Scopus
 
Ulrich's Periodicals Directory

Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2021


Contents

  • Volume (9): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2021


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2020


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2020


Contents

  • Volume (8): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2020


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (7): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2019


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (6): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2018


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (5): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2017


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (4): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2016


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (1&2)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (3): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2015


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (2): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2014


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (1)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (2)
  • Cover date: 2012


Contents

  • Volume (1): Issue (3)
  • Cover date: 2012


Principal Editor

Flavia Laviosa
Wellesley College, USA
flaviosa@wellesley.edu

Associate Editor

Milly Buonanno
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
milly.buonanno@fondazione.uniroma1.it

Stephen Gundle
University of Warwick, UK
S.Gundle@warwick.ac.uk

Giorgio Bertellini
University of Michigan, USA
giorgiob@umich.edu

Reviews Editor

Ellen Nerenberg
Wesleyan University, USA
enerenberg@wesleyan.edu

Editorial Assistants

Diego Bonelli
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Glen Bonnici
University of Malta, Malta

Jim Carter
University of Michigan, USA

Jacqueline Galison
Wellesley College, USA

Tatum Kawabata
Wellesley College, USA

Rory McKenzie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Federica Notari
Utrecht University, Netherlands

Carlo Maria Rabai
University of Bologna, Italy

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